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CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:30pm EST
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 7:00pm EST
and identify yourself. all right. >> yes. thank you. where is rule of law fit into this? >> well, rule of law can be a very important part of establishing legitimacy. because, as i said, it is very hard to win with a pure scorched-earth strategy. even when you're willing to be as brutal as the nazis, they still did not manage to pacify the balkans in world war two. even if you're willing to be as cruel as the soviets, they still did not manage to pass -- pacify afghanistan, even though there were willing to kill a million people. because the nazis and the soviets offered nothing positive. they offered no reason why the people of yugoslavia the people of afghanistan would support them. they offer nothing but death and desolation, and that ultimately was not a winning strategy. i think the people do want to see is the rule of law, not necessarily our law, but their law. that is something that i think people respond positively to. if they see that the soldiers around them are enforcing the law rather than preying upon them, rather than stealing from them, rather than ripping their daughters, if
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 8:00pm EST
notification procedures established by law. but this change in policy to succeed, it must be done in a responsible, measured and coherent way. i would general dempsey describe her plan of action in greater detail. the bottom line is further integration of women will occur expeditiously. even as we recognize the need to institutionalize changes of this importance. the steps we announced today are significant. in many ways they are an affirmation of where we been having a state department for more than 10 years. nevertheless, it will take leadership and professionalism to effectively implement these changes. i am confident in our ability to do that because i am confident in the leadership that general dempsey in the joint chiefs of staff have demonstrated throughout this process. this has truly been a team effort and i deeply admire the extremely arrowing considerate approach they've taken. i want to express my deepest thanks to marty dempsey for his leadership in all the service chiefs who have been working on this issue and as a group, came forward with the recommendation we are i
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 9:00am EST
of dangerous individuals has always been the law. forcing those law more effectively must become a national priority and we must also consider additional qualities -- policies. so we should start by making sure that all records of dangerous individual are headed into the national criminal background check system including mental health records, restraining orders, and other prohibiting records. it also seems to make good sense to close the gun show loophole and extend the background requirements to individual transfer of firearms with reasonable common sense but such a program must be offered for easy online application process and can be used as a foundation for gun registration program of any type. it should simply incorporate additional firearm sales into the same background check program that exist for sales from commercial dealers. exemption should be offered for family to family transaction, any instance my father had begun to me for inheritance, as was for temporary support for self-defense purposes but individuals who reside in rural areas that make the check in practical an individ
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00pm EST
hundreds of ordinances and state laws. most of which were unconstitutional. and he didn't know what to do. johnson dearly did not want to send troops, united states army troops, into alabama. his fear was that this would precipitate really a second period of reconstruction. just as the marchers were getting ready to head out in defiance of a court or order, wh hundreds of deputies and troopers waiting for them. fruition came to a very subtle problematic plan that johnson had been working on all night, and king had been listening to all night. johnson said, former -- johnson sent former governor, rely collins, who had taken the job to run the federal con sillation service, on a plane at 2:00 in the morning. he was picked up by assistant attorney general john dore, and was driven to the place where king was staying. king came out of the bedroom wearing a robe and two officials gave him a plan. and lyndon johnson had participated in thinking it up. they said, reverend king, we not only have been talking to you, we've been talking to governor wallace, and he doesn't want anymore bloodshed, an
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm EST
-slaveholders and slaveholders alike were basically loyal law abiding citizen who were being tricked or anti-secession and minority of extremists. leaving slavery allowed would hopefully when i'm back. that's the expectation. but after a full year of war and despite lincoln effort to spare their property and spare their feelings, precious few slaveowners producing any active sympathy to the union or union policies. this lack of support is supposedly prounion slaveowners isolde marbury son in the light at the bad news that was around that time coming from the virginia battlefield of 1862. meanwhile, it is painfully clear that confederate armies were everywhere benefiting greatly from the forced labor performed for them by slaves, and placing artillery and this sketch comic you read to be sick and wounded, tending horses, cooking and cleaning, raising the push for the population and the army. more and more republican leaders now therefore concluded that attempting to fight the war without offending the end he was impossible. concluded on the contrary that union armies must become more aggressi
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
we ask of each citizen is to respect the law, and i think that you and the rest must take care and must beware of that. another issue, it's about syria -- >> no, let's talk about the women's issue, because it's an important one. this is not, first of all, nobody in the west is trying to get women to take their veils off. the issue as described in the arab development report written by an arab woman is that there are three great deficits in the arab world x the third one -- and the third one is the rights of women. this is written by an arab about the arab world with enormous amounts of data. by any comparison with the rest of the world, the status of women in the arab world is poor. so, you know, i think part of solving the problem and dealing with it is to acknowledge that it exists. my own humble suggestion would be that you can make this into an anti-western crusade, but the truth of the matter is the women in the arab world deserve better. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: but i have not, i have not blamed the west. i have not blamed the west, and i don'
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 11:00pm EST
of -- a fire and everybody's in to try to dheep from getting out of control. with the law, in the aftermath of that, there was a defining event and that was the iraq's encouraging in to kuwait. we saw the global presence put together by jim baker and george h. w. bush and the success in the engagement of it. but subsequent to that, we have seen a completely different scene. that is what i would describe as three alarmers and two alarmers. we about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world within all of a sudden you have people who don't have the -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference have basically come to the conclusion that the world has changed and we can't afford nor do we have the public support for global open gaugement. -- engagement. when you talk to people back home and you say why do we give so much foreign aid? it is literally like saying, you know, you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and you get a haircut and solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid and presence now is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insign
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 7:00am EST
parity addiction, into law in 2008, major accomplishment, concern because the interim final rule published in 2010 left some implementation details on result. the administration publishes a final rule, how we address issues like the scope of services that must be covered because insurers have detailed guidance and need to implement the law? >> thank you. as you know, the final rule published in 2010, part of what was requested by the public was in put on several topics, that was one. in the meantime we issued four or five sub regulatory guidance, we have also been meeting with stakeholders and industry trying to understand how the implementation is happening. we are ready to produce the final rag and we're in the process now. >> dr. insel? i have some concerns and i know others have also. i have read a lot about these concerns and i hear them from constituents and other people who talk to me about the use of pharmaceuticals, particularly anti psychotic medication in children. what i hear sometimes does something, get them drug. get some anti psychotic medication. what do we know
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:00pm EST
brothers and i grew up a long time ago, back in a time when certain places in our country had unfair laws that said it was right to keep black people separate because our skin was darker and our ancestors had been captured in far off africa and brought to america as slaves. ok. then we came to -- we come now to atlanta, georgia. the city in which we were growing up had those laws. because of those laws, my family rarely went to picture shows. in fact, to this very day, i don't recall ever seeing my father on a street car because of those laws and the indignity that went with them, daddy preferred keeping m.l., a.d., and me close to home where we would be protected. but we lived in a neighborhood in atlanta now called sweet arbor. and this is the street. you can see the cars. you haven't seen cars like that, have you? they don't have any like that now. ok. something like we used to call a t model ford and so tpot. ok. we lived there on the avenue. and on our side of the street, there were two-story frame houses, similar to the one we lived in. across the street crouched a line of one-story
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
government in his negotiations at the u.n. to codify the laws against coca. what was happening, was in constant medication with the company primary for the vice president, vice pays, who really got to feel the relationship between them over time. they just had a really interesting parlay between each other. so that's the beginning of an overview of the book. i want to pass the mic back and forth and i think we're going to have questions for each other. but that's the beginning. >> at evening. i'm at the super policies were around the trip policy there. i was once asked to check to a group of high school students in the literature resume and background and came up with the topic and you had to speak to the topic. this being a high school dance, they wanted here but sex, drugs and international relations. at that home-equity type these things together. it didn't dawn on me until the last minute and i realized the way to tell that story was through the story of columbus, who i considered the granddaddy of international drug traffickers. how you see the world depends where you say,
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 10:00am EST
a criminal offense under international law. so while coca-cola was guaranteed the right to use coca as a flavoring in their own product, indigenous peoples across the andes were told that the traditional practice of coca leaf chewing and drinking coca tea would no longer be tolerated by the international community. and the u.s. was the architect of these treaties, um, certainly had support from other countries. today they have key allies in their effort to maintain the treaties such as russia, japan, sweden. but it really is a u.s. instrument. so coca, along with cannabis and opium, became the main targets of the 1961 convention. this historical error, as i like to call it, was basically justified by the 1950 report of the commission of inquiry on the coca leaf which, as sanho pointed out, is a totally racist document. it's totally, totally racist, has absolutely no scientific evidence. you'll be outraged as you read it, yet it is still the basis for the international drug control convention's treatment of coca. subsequent to that in the 1990s, the u.n. world health organization, th
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 8:30am EST
. and later, live coverage of a forum examining a law passed in 2005 that sets minimum standards for driver's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. jo
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 9:00pm EST
're taught in. so the process could seem boring to the outsider but someone who loves law the way i do but the other half with interacting with the public, the supreme court gets visitors from around the world. i have met with school children as young as second grade. grammar school, high school, college, professiona l, not just law school by meet with students to be doctors, businessmen, and meet with groups of all kinds who meet with the justices to have a conversation judges from around the world that people read our pieces. but for each of us to learn from each other but i travel for law school, bar association and enjoy other types of groups but how what makes me so passionate for what i do i can get them to understand a little bit better. i am told they will be better citizens, more active citizens working in the community. we are busy on a lot of different cases. it is a microcosm. >>host: the most popular question submitted is how do the justices get along? [laughter] i know relations among you are deeply collegial. so i am wondering whether the conference rituals and how do yo
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 7:00am EST
will not let robert go to the war. about the time of yorktown, she ultimately agrees to law her oldest son to help george with his correspondence. he goes, contracts a camp fever and dies as martha's rushing to camp to meet him. he leaves behind four young children. martha and george adopt the youngest two. >> i just wanted to make one comment. there was an interesting article in "the new york times" last week about mitterand and his mistress and mistress' daughter who is a writer, and the fact that at his funeral the mistress and the wife were next to each other, one arm around the other. it was just an interesting comment on how the french treat these kind of relationships. >> yeah. i think it's early on in the book i talk about is this unique to america, that the public is just fascinated with the sex scandal? you know, i think there's reason to be angry at bill clinton and reasons not to be angry at bill clinton over the monica lewinsky thing, but on one level you could say the economy's booming, we're at peace, you know? fantastic things are happening. and we're angry because a presid
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 10:00pm EST
laude a the highest price for the a director while attending yale law school she was editor of the law journal. she could have become a highly paid lawyer out of yale but she went right into public-service becoming the assistant district attorneys serving the people of new york. she served in almost all levels of the judicial system including private practice as well as years on the federal bench. 2009 president barack obama nominated in the u.s. senate confirmed sonia sotomayor as a 111th justice of the u.s. supreme court. io give you sonia sotomayor. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] spee net after a guide to washington in 2009, i net to a whole bunch of texans from everywhere in this large state. and i have been repeatedly invited to visit. and when you get a new job you are a little busy? so i have not been able to come. but it is a tribute to the warmth of the people that has been confirmed in a few hours i have been here already. that this is the third city on my tour. first washington now my home and the home of my heart comedy york and i've been back and forth a lot
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 5:00pm EST
, republicans voted on the budget control act. they hope this passÉ. it was a law. as senator murray announced today, this year the senate will return to regular order in the budget resolution to the senate floor. the house republicans had to add a gimmick or to today ago that i understand, we all understand the tea party plays a big part in what goes on in the house and they need a gimmick or two to get things done over there. but spare the metaclass another knockdown drag out fight, we are going to proceed to work on this legislation intended out of here as quickly as we can. i went to give credit where credit is due and i think speaker boehner for his leadership in defusing a site over the debt ceiling debate. as i said before, not everything has to be a big fight. this proposal they have in the house is that worth fighting about. so again, i think the speaker for his work in this regard. the metaclass has been telling us they don't want another crisis in this showcase send the security they deserve. senator durbin. >> thank you, mr. leader. america is suffering from confrontation fatigue.
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
was a graduate of harvard law school, a graduate 1948, worked at a major corporate law firm on old and major firm but he was really bored by the corporate law practice. he described it in his first book published in 1968 and it's not really an autobiography but there are some of the biographical chapters that are quite interesting. he says well, there's all these silent victories and muted defeats in these quiet conversations in these board rooms of the law firm and he wanted more action than that and he also loved politics so much that he had in some way, shape or form he had to do it full time so he walks away from the wall street law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives just a few blocks south of here somewhere near the russell building at a little apartment and he joins a very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. his importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950's was apparently significant that whitaker chambers said in a letter around that time that morris accomplished more of what joe mccarthy is credited with in terms of useful and constructiv
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 11:00am EST
was a graduate of harvard law school, graduated in 1948, worked in a major wall street law firm corporate law and known as chairman sterling on hold and major firm but he was bored by corporate law practice. he described in his first book in 1968 and not really an autobiography but a lot of chapters that are interesting. he said there were these silent victories and huge defeats and quiet conversations in board rooms of our law firm and he wanted more action than that. he also loved politics so much that he really had in some way, shape or form had to do it full time so he walks away from his wall street law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives a few blocks south of here, somewhere near the russell building in little apartment and joins a very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. robert morris's importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950s was apparently so significant that whitaker chambers said to buckley in a letter around that time that morris really accomplished most of what joe mccarthy is credited with in terms of useful and constructive
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 11:00pm EST
at the enemy who are trying to take the united states and replace it with sharia law. a young medical lieutenant who went to a conference and the imam gets up there and says that we have to take the word of god, the koran, and replace the constitution with it. he -- like the 27-year-old said, that's sedition, and anybody in this audience should leave. he was in uniform. so what we need to do in america is to find out who is our enemy? and know one has been able to articulate that until rick santorum did so. he completely understands the threat. we are at war. the algerian incident, the libyan incident, the cole bombing, this is not isolated incidents by kid with 17-year-old acne cases and think i'm going to blow somebody up. this is a concerted evident to take down america and if you look at the dallas holyland trial, i gave speech to 800 people. the speaker before me said, how many of you heard about the dallas holy land trial where the muslim brotherhood was -- had a document said we want to replace the constitution with sharia law. eight hand went up. so i think the fact that on th
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
are quite prominent for the freedom of the press. the student press law center all of which had his imprint on them. i want to say one last thing and then we are going to start talking about a story as many of you know. atlanta lost a great editor this week when gene patterson passed away down in st. pete, the editor of the atlanta constitution when jack was here and jean wants told the story about jack being a reporter, celebrated reporter when machine got a call from the publisher of "the los angeles times" and he said i'm thinking of the "los angeles times" wants to set up shop in alana. you have a big story brewing in the south. the civil rights story and the emerging south. and i need a reporter to set up the bureau in the "los angeles times." do you have any good reporters, and jean says you know mr. chairman we have a great reporters he purposely left off the name of jack nelson. he wasn't about to give him up. and a weak leader otas hired jack nelson that's how jack got to the "los angeles times" with great work here in alana. he brought investigative reporting to the civil rights s
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 8:00pm EST
the highest price for an undergraduate while attending yale law school. she was editor of the "yale law journal". she could have become a highly paid lawyer, but she went right into public service, becoming an assistant district attorney serving the people of new york. she served in almost all levels of the judicial system including private legal practice as well as years on the federal bench. in 2009, president barack obama nominated and the u.s. senate confirmed sonia sotomayor as the 111th justice of the u.s. supreme court. i give few sonia sotomayor.o [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] >> after i got to washington in 2009, i met a whole bunch of texans from everywhere in this large state and i have been repeatedly invited to visit, and you know when you get a new job you are a little bit -- so i haven't been able to come. but its attribute to the warmth of the people i met that have been confirmed in a few hours that i have been here already. this is the third city on my tour. i was first in washington, my new home. i went back to the home of my heart, new york,
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 3:00pm EST
and law partner was a guy named oscar pole sound. and cleveland spent most of his career in buffalo, the mayor and governor of you. he was a lawyer and he and oscar folsom were partners. they would drink and eat together, and it appears they also enjoyed the services of maria hallpin together. so, when maria hallpin gets pregnant, she has a son, and neither oscar foalson nor grover cleveland knew who the father was, and maria complicates things by naming the child oscar cleveland. so oscar folsom had a marriage and had a temperature. cleveland was a bachelor so kind of accepted the responsibility to pay for the child. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar folsom dies a few years later in a carriage accident. driving his carriage, recklessly thrown from it. breaks his neck. leaves a widow and this young girl francis. grover cleveland makes an enormous amount of money as his law partner, and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, he pay for them. sets them up in a nice home for his best friend and former law partner. he becomes a godfather the little girl, she cal
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 9:00am EST
a couple of former governors, harvard law professor, engineer, to name a few. while they have each accomplished so much already, their greatest achievements are still ahead of them. i know they'll look back with satisfaction at the work we do together in the united states senate. our caucus and our country faces immense challenges. as we go through tests and trials, this diverse group in the senate will be united by a single objective, to fight for fairness and balance on behalf of the middle class. we're going to continue to work on old rules -- excuse me, madam president. we'll continue to work with, i will with the republican leader on a package of reforms that i hope we can agree on. as i've said before, if we don't agree, then we're going to do something as a democratic caucus alone. i do remain cautiously optimistic we'll be able to move forward on a bipartisan basis. i hope we can do that. if we do that -- and i'll have more to say about that if in fact we can do that -- we're not going to get everything we want. the republicans aren't going to get everything they want. but
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 5:00pm EST
, looking to their government, people who are good citizens, pay their taxes, obey the rules, follow the law and ultimately say we have been left behind. it is enough, mr. president. another 118 days, that's all we have left to memorial day and the beginning of a critically important season for new jersey's economy. a $37 billion tourism industry that cannot get back on its feet unless the federal government says here is how we're going to help businesses reopen. here's how we're going to help people get back into their homes. here's how we're going to help you rebuild the infrastructure that is not only important to the state's economy but to the national economy for which new jersey and of course new york are such big drivers of this national economy, well over 10% to 11%. we only have 118 days, and we have been languishing. now, i personally am tired of listening to the voices of patients and delay and suggesting that somehow we as citizens of the united states are second-class citizens waiting for this government to respond to the needs of fellow americans. that is not what i envision wh
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm EST
janet napolitano today called on congress' overhaul the country's immigration laws and create a pathway to citizenship for people in the country illegally. she spoke of the woodrow wilson center about the holistic the department's agenda and the president's second term. secretary napolitano was introduced by jane harman who is the president of the wilson center. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> i'm jane harman, director and president, ceo of the wilson center, and i want to a special welcome the chairman of the board, outboard, my boss, member of, and the members of the world trade council and alliances. it's an honor to cohost this event with the aspen institute, and to welcome ambassadors from bulgaria, canada, costa rica, the czech republic, and arab states, and maybe others. unlike the washington monument or the lincoln memorial, the wilson center is a living memorial to our 20th presiden president. who studied congress, this center was chartered by congress in 1968, and we claim to offer a safe political space for independent research and open dialogue that lisa actionable idea
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 9:00am EST
budgets annually, as the law requires. they have laid out their priorities for the public to see their plans to control spending could save our most important social programs from collapse. to reform an outdated and anticompetitive tax code, and to streamline government bureaucracies that are literally suffering job creation. they have done their jobs while senate democrats have tried to keep their priorities secret. now, we know senate democrats don't like the house budgets, and we know they don't even support the president's budgets, at least not with their votes. what we haven't known for nearly four years is what they're for, because they have refused to put their plans for the country down on paper and actually vote for them. now it's my hope that the democratic sudden interest in passing a budget isn't just another attempt to actually raise taxes. as i've said repeatedly, we're done with the revenue issue. the president has already said that the so-called rich are now paying their -- quote -- "fair share" -- end quote, and of course middle-class families are already on the
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2013 5:00pm EST
requirements. for example, to become a law, a bill must pass both houses of congress identical, then it's subject to the president's veto power, and then, of course, there's always the courts and the supreme court to rule on the constitutionality of legislation. the senate itself is a check on pure majority rule. as james madison said again, the use -- and this is to quote madison -- "the use of the senate is to consist in its proceeding with more coolness, with more system, with more wisdom than the popular branch," meaning the house of representatives. to achieve this person, sphrins the smallest states -- from the smallest states which the same number of representatives from the largest states, which i dmentd on earlier. further, senators are elected every six years, not every two years. these are ample to protect minority rights and to restrain pure majority rule. what is not necessary, what was never intended is an extra constitutional empowerment of the minority through a de facto requirement that a supermajority of senators be needed to even consider a bill or nominee, let alone
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 11:00pm EST
that are all the things that help move countries from poverty to wealth making sure the proper root of law accountability free plat -- press property rights and we will be making the argument in the g8 we need greater transparency about land ownership companies in greater transparency about tax. these are arguments that britain will be pushing in and. sneak will the prime minister confirm that the first government for 30 years not to offer hard-pressed consumers a government-funded energy efficiency scheme following the closure of -- >> eco-scheme which is many times the size of the warm front. in eco-could help up to 230 families a year so it's potentially a better scheme. >> what assessments has the prime minister made of unemployment in my constituency and in particular more women and and -- speeding the point the honorable gentleman makes is absolutely right. there are now more people employed in the private sector than ever before and there are also more women employed in our country than ever before. when you look at the employment figures that have come out today what is remarkable
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
fundamental set of values and laws. and, um, before that i couldn't -- at first i'd pinch myself. i just couldn't get over the fact that there was no earlier use, and i used all the databases, and i actually got somebody the legislative reference service at the library of congress to actually back me up on it. can you guys find an earlier example of it? at first there was sort of a deep breath saying, oh, my god, this guy's nuts, but the idea was nobody could find it. then somebody said the founding fathers of harvard university or something, but it was never used as a scripter for the -- descriptor for the people who framed the constitution. it's interesting, also, that it really didn't take off until 1941 when a book was written called "founding fathers." but it was immediately adopted by both sides of the aisle although some of the early uses when you go back and track when it starts being used in the '20s more and more often in replacing the word "framers," it's often used as a negative. the founding fathers never meant for us to have pastel-colored postage stamps, or the founding fa
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 5:00pm EST
. the student press law center from all of which have jackson print on the. i want to say one last thing here, and then we're going to start talking to tell a little story. as many as you know, atlanta in the world lost a great attitude this week passed away down in st. pete. gene had been the editor of the atlanta constitution when jack was here. gene once told the story about jack being a reporter and a celebrated report whinging got a call from the publishers of the los angeles times. mr. chandler said, gene, i'm thinking that the los angeles times wants to set up shop in atlanta. you have a big story bring there in the south. the civil-rights story in the emerging south. onion report to staff that bureau in atlanta for the los angeles times. you have any good reporters? and jean says, you know, we have tons of reporters. he started listing all these reporters. he purposely left off the name of jack nelson. he was not about to give him up. a week later he hired jack nelson. did the los angeles times. he did great work here in atlanta. he brought investigative reporting to the civil rights
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 11:00am EST
justice and they could hide out beyond the arm of contemporary international law. and fifth al qaeda would serve, this also import from the notion of talibanistan, serve as a base certain for the conquest of afghanistan, and included in that is their notion of western pakistan and the name of global jihad. this is important because of the mythical origins about where al qaeda come from and how it it it builds up in afghanistan itself. i argue in the peace that these five essential elements of bin laden's al qaeda go through them were completely devastated by the rate and abbottabad and the passage of time has eroded by about 50% of the two. the notion of al qaeda as bringing that was free from retribution or have impunity from being attacked and captured, that was exploded literally in the manner in which and the finale of which that bin laden met his end. to most of us who followed jihadi websites, we saw in the traffic short after bin laden's death, sort of a period of two to three months that this notion of how could this happen was followed by the claim and desire to have revenge, a re
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 1:00am EST
african-american civil rights lawyers who practiced law during the era of segregation and it's about their struggles with civil rights and racial identity. at it about the fact that to be an african-american civil rights lawyer in this era, argue in the book, is to be caught between the black and who it world. both blacks and whites want things of these lawyers and identify with these lawyers. so, to be this kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him, was not just an african-american lawyer but member caught between the black and white world. >> host: how difficult for an african-american to become a lawyer at that time. >> guest: it's not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to good to law school like everybody everybody else, which does cost money, but it's difficult to be a lawyer because no african-american lawyer in this period is going to have white clients or very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have money and if you have money and you're black, you hire a white lawyer, because white lawyers will be more effective in a segregated soc
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 8:00pm EST
or protect law-enforcement seeking billion dollars in our next budget. our office of safety working group has also had stronger relationships with officers across the country and building a platform for researching threats they face on a daily basis. under a groundbreaking training and technical assistance program called valor, were enabling officers to anticipate, to prevent and to survive violent encounters. things to initiatives like the bulletproof vest initiative program, were providing money for snap with equipment that is quite frankly saving lives. a stunner childhood task force, will bring in a variety of partners together from expanding screening and assessment of at-risk children and supporting research to help combat unacceptable levels of violent a month and directed towards nation's youth. we still question we can be proud of these to produce violent impact of the station. as you've been discussing this week and is the president has made quite clear, we cannot yet be satisfied and become complacent. when it comes to combating gun violence in ensuring the safety of our citizens a
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 6:00am EST
'm a gun owner, and i believe that law-abiding citizens have a second amendment right to own firearms. i'm not interested in giving up my firearms, my gun, and i'm not going to ask other law-abiding americans to give up theirs. and not only is the this something that i believe in personally, after the supreme court ruled in the heller decision, this is off the table. the court ruled that law-abiding citizens have a right to own firearms. so i don't want that discussion irrespective of what side of the issue you're on, should not get in the way of the work that we're doing. but as a father and a grandfather, i also believe that we have a responsibility to make our schools, our streets and our communities safe places. and i know, i know this from the bottom of my heart, i know that we can do both of these. and i know that we're going to. as chair of this gun violence prevention task force, i'm working with my colleagues -- many of whom are here today -- to develop a comprehensive set of policy proposals that will both reduce gun violence and respect the second amendment. i've met with virt
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
the law sunsetted. i would eventually say there is not a single republican vote in the house or senate to provide more revenue and the reason for that is we all know that revenue is not the problem. $200,000, or $250,000 per couple, this is not a revenue problem, this is a spending problem. so yes, the revenue issue is behind us. and whatever new taxes the president is going to get, he got by operation of law on new year's eve and we now going to focus on the real problem is not that we taxed too little, but that we spend too much. and yes, that is where we are. >> [inaudible question] >> i have a couple thoughts about the debt ceiling in general. it's been used 20 times since the 1950s for major spending reform. you will remember the clinton republican congress deficit reduction package. are calling senate democrats run the senate to follow the regular order. the debt ceiling can originate from either house. the senate finance committee could generate a gut feeling proposal. it would be incumbent upon the senate majority to function. what is their idea about raising the debt ceiling.
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 10:00pm EST
's a little code put into the tax law in the late 1970s called the 401(k), and these high end executives have the right to put money aside on a tax deferred basis. no one thinks anything of this except for one man, an attorney, and he said why should it just be high end executives? you have to see all of us. they get the administration to agree with his view point on this, and this takes place by the time of the early 1980s, and then the next part, which almost nobody foresaw is the idea that, wait a minute, we don't have to give people pensions, do we? these 401(k)s are really could substitute for a pension, and this is where the corporate cost cutters creep in, and hey, even if you match at 6%, it's cheaper than funding a pension, and, besides, a lot of people won't sign up anyway, don't worry about the 6%. slowly, but surely, over a period of many years, the numbers drift down to where we are today. >> host: and, of course, this was happening while the stock market was just raging through the 80s and 90s, and people thought they were forever going to get 25% returns a year. >> guest: corre
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00am EST
across settings, that the same kind of decisionmaking and the same kind of culture and in-laws, rigidity, focus, consistency, is present in indonesia and equatorial begin knee and suburban maryland and the washington offices, because they have constructed a global system, and global policies that are so unified and so codified and transcribed down their channel of system, and everybody who work atlantis gets up in the morning and is reading out of the same playbook. almost like a military operation or a sports team that is exceptionally well organized around the same playbook. and i think they're kind of self-conscious about that military metaphor. they're unusual among corporations in that everyone who is at the top grew up together. if you took the top 100 publicly traded corporations in the united states and you chose the top 40 jobs at each of those corporations corporations and mapped who the people were, there would be a significant number of people who came from a competing company laterally, moved over, or came from another interest, and emcame in with reforming ideas. so morse c
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 8:00am EST
on caffeine. >> my question, have you ever heard of campbell's law? >> no. >> pardon me, i would again. the greater the social, economic consequences of say with the statistics such as test scores, the more likely it is that the statistic itself will become corrupted. and that is corrupting the social processing it is intended to monitor spend time writing a short piece for "the wall street journal" to summarize some of the key findings. one of the headlines is smart managers will use statistics to evaluate employees, smart and playful figure how to manipulate those statistics. the one that is quite scary in the book from new york states where they simply decide that they would provide data on mortality rates or angioplasty, for cardiology. information is always good, it turned out that the new times are somewhat followed up and the high proportion, something like 78% of cardiologists have it delivered a change their behavior because of the evaluation. it was not to kill fewer people, it wasn't like boy, i killed a lot of history. today i'm not going to drink, right? [laughter] it was
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:25am EST
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raids the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: looking at the appropriation bills and not done the last two years and say we appropriate x amount of money it is over $350 billion that which is not funded and it tells you there is the imbalance in congress had we appropriate funds we have not said we spend money on? that tells you the power of the benefit going back to what is the most important but is it more important to think what is the health of the country and the long run? to put yourself on the losing side of every argument coming have to work hard to explain yourself. >> members of congress to not have the opportunity to read the bills they vote on. >> one of the most secret and intimate -- ways is to report language only members of the committee can vote or amend. each year congress spends countless hours to debate the budget resolution and has no intention of keeping. number 10, congress circumvents its own budget limits to avoid public scrutiny by exploiting its own budget. >> guest: those
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:30pm EST
his eyes had been. so this comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham.
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:30pm EST
pay some poor kenyan for some? so it's been that kind of situation. >> host: you've been to law e, texas, kansas for your research on this and now you are in kenya when does the research part of it in the? >> guest: you just know when you get there. actually the research never ends. there is a point i say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sur
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15pm EST
coolidge the law and order candidate. the phrase was rarely used before but it was the first time it was used as a political motto. again there are various people who i have to list is the best. there are couple of things that are in the book that are not american that came from overseas. israili is a real dark horse which is part of the political language and one that threw me a bit was the first person to use social security was winston churchill. in 1906 in an essay about modern society and what has to be done but he is the one who creates the term social security. there are some people that really do well with it. i think if you had a list of who were the most powerful presidents in terms of language i think you have -- frankly roosevelt has to be way up there. not only the phrases are but if he -- iffy he's talking about the supreme court insist some of these decisions of the supreme court if you ask me our iffy. next day the lead of the papers was in fact the president created the word today iffy and for five or six years anytime a columnist in the tribune said pardon me
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 12:00pm EST
of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category. >> thank you very much bigger to operating in africa today, aqim, al-shabaab to name a few come in your view, which pose the greatest threats to the united states command given the limited capacity in some cases the limited political will of the countries in which these groups operate. the u.s. military intelligence and security assistance resources devoted to these threats adequately are appropriately balanced
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 1:00pm EST
and don't use language shutdown the conversation. i don't know if you're familiar with godwin's law, a tale that talks about dissolved into someone called a. there's no room for further discussion. i try to divulge that in the book in the way i approach people on a day-to-day basis. having said that, if i sent someone a century for deceitful, i confront that, at least as they see it. >> host: ron miller, and "sellout" talk about living in louisiana as one of the worst use of your life. >> guest: as a military brat, not being accustomed to a school where you had predominantly black student in the attitudes that came with it, here i am, a kid that dressed a certain way, spoke a certain way, had a certain respect for authority and put you into an environment where those things are not held in regard and i was ridiculed. i was harassed, teachers pet, talking like a white boy, all these things are not made. the irony was the only reason it didn't taste too likely kids at the school took a liking to me and defended me they are much bigger than anyone else. i might've been held back a coup
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